“It’s going to be a rebuild and not a repair”: Entergy Gives Important Bayou Region Updates (2024)

Entergy is taking strides towards power restoration across the region. But for Terrebonne and Lafourche Parishes, power could take a while.

In an interview with the Times, Entergy officials said they have had significant damage in the Houma-Terrebonne and Lafourche areas. They have resources that have moved in and they are starting to execute their plan to be able to restore service to those impacted customers here in the bayou areas.

“It’s going to be a rebuild and not a repair”: Entergy Gives Important Bayou Region Updates (1)


Nearly 3,500 poles are down in Terrebonne Parish, 9,500 poles are down in Lockport, and 4,000 poles are down in Luling. The company recognizes that there is a lot of work to be done in these devastated areas. They recently accessed issues in these areas and many of those have been cleared up. They have been able to complete the areas’ assessments a day and a half ago, and are moving crews down to the area.

Entergy VP for Distribution Operations John Hawkins said one of the things he wants to make everyone aware of is that many of the areas require specialized equipment, such as airboats, track machines, and four-wheelers. They also have to get lodging in the areas so their resources can be closer to the work. “We understand we have a lot of work to do down there to rebuild. Things are coming to fruition, and we are working,” he said.

Rebuild and restore are two different things, Hawkins told the Times. When you talk about restoration, it is usually a pole down here and there, along with some wire, but in the bayou regions, they are seeing poles having to be replaced on multiple blocks. This is what they call a rebuild. Hawkins said Ida had caused more pole damage than Hurricane Katrina, Hurricane Delta, and Hurricane Zeta combined!


Entergy Louisiana President and CEO Phillip May said the greater metro areas and the jobs of restoring the transmission system are largely complete. He said as you get into the bayou regions, the work is still definitely underway. The focus, he said, is to be able to energize the substations. There is considerable damage as you get into the bayou regions, so restoring the transmission lines are the first step, then restoration of substations is second.

“I have to emphasize,” May said, “that the process is going to focus first on critical infrastructures, such as hospitals, and what we hope to do is to be able to provide power to commercial centers so people can have access to grocery stores, and big-box stores, and home improvement stores.” He said they have been using generators to power areas that have had extended outages. They will look at those areas that have extended outages to see whether or not having a generator there will help to restore power to critical infrastructure.

When asked about the September 29 estimated restoration date, they said they are working towards that date, and sometimes with restoration, you might run across an instance where it could be extended. They said they have had those instances where they have restored before the estimated dates. “We are challenging ourselves to do what we can to get these communities back to normal, as safely and quickly as possible. That is the goal. That is the mission,” May said.


They said the more urban areas come back online first, and then will expand out from the city centers to more rural areas. Those bayou areas are the areas that are going to take longer, and even with the date of September 29, they say they will be working to exceed goals, “but those areas that have been hit hard, are going to be challenging, even with those dates.”

Those dates, unfortunately, could change if the disturbance in the gulf impacts the area. They said they are pleased about the progress so far, but they are currently monitoring a tropical disturbance in the Gulf. Fortunately, all sources indicate it is unlikely to develop, but it could bring a lot of rain to our already saturated region. Their primary focus will be to ensure their crews can shelter safely if the area does experience inclement weather. If we are impacted, this could challenge restorations. Any winds over 30 mph require linemen to cradle their buckets. They will continue to monitor and adjust plans as necessary.

May also announced that Entergy will be waiving late fees for ELL and ENO customers and also will be suspending disconnections. “If you’re not able to pay your bill, or if you’re not able to get mail, “ May said, “ these are two actions that will help assure that you will still get power.”

“It’s going to be a rebuild and not a repair”: Entergy Gives Important Bayou Region Updates (4)


“I would like to thank those customers who don’t yet have power with their continued patience,” May said. “We ask that they continue to be patient and to know that we have a massive team working to restore the power as quickly as possible and we will continue to provide estimated restoration dates as soon as we are able to.”

He advised the restoration dates given are “no later than” dates and to visit www.entergy.com/hurricanida/etr for updated estimated restoration times.

May also said one of the things they have been seeing is people that are touching equipment and wires trying to help with removal. He stressed that there are great dangers after a type of storm like Ida. He said to STAY AWAY from downed lines. Take a look at what may be connected to those lines. If there is metal fencing in your backyard and there’s a line on it, it may extend a current along the fence. When removing wet debris, also take heed, because an electrical current can also extend throughout that debris. There are no ways to know if a down power line is energized or not, so stay away.

“It’s going to be a rebuild and not a repair”: Entergy Gives Important Bayou Region Updates (5)


Hawkins said they have a lot of great men and women that are committed and dedicated and they genuinely care about the customers. They have people that are impacted across the state, especially down in the Southern region. He said the linemen truly want to focus on healing the community.

Hawkins concluded, “We will not leave until every customer is restored – you will continue to see additional resources hour by hour, day by day, any area. You will know that we’re there to get the community back on its feet. We know that’s what matters most. We’ll focus on those critical customers and get people restored back to their normal state as best we can.”

Photos Submitted by Entergy:

“It’s going to be a rebuild and not a repair”: Entergy Gives Important Bayou Region Updates (6)


“It’s going to be a rebuild and not a repair”: Entergy Gives Important Bayou Region Updates (7)

Lockport, Louisiana

“It’s going to be a rebuild and not a repair”: Entergy Gives Important Bayou Region Updates (8)

Grand Isle, Louisiana

“It’s going to be a rebuild and not a repair”: Entergy Gives Important Bayou Region Updates (9)

“It’s going to be a rebuild and not a repair”: Entergy Gives Important Bayou Region Updates (2024)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Gov. Deandrea McKenzie

Last Updated:

Views: 6197

Rating: 4.6 / 5 (46 voted)

Reviews: 85% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Gov. Deandrea McKenzie

Birthday: 2001-01-17

Address: Suite 769 2454 Marsha Coves, Debbieton, MS 95002

Phone: +813077629322

Job: Real-Estate Executive

Hobby: Archery, Metal detecting, Kitesurfing, Genealogy, Kitesurfing, Calligraphy, Roller skating

Introduction: My name is Gov. Deandrea McKenzie, I am a spotless, clean, glamorous, sparkling, adventurous, nice, brainy person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.